Discrimination

  • July 11, 2024

    Florida's Trans Care Ban Won't Be Paused Pending Appeal

    A federal judge denied Florida's request Thursday to pause a court order blocking a state law that bans or restricts gender-affirming care for transgender minors and adults while it challenges the ruling at the Eleventh Circuit, finding the state hasn't shown it would be harmed by the law's stagnation.

  • July 11, 2024

    4 Big Gender-Affirming Care Decisions From 2024's 1st Half

    The U.S. Supreme Court allowed an Idaho law banning gender-affirming care for minors to become effective, the Eleventh Circuit upheld a trial court win for a transgender public safety employee in a healthcare discrimination suit and a Florida federal judge blocked as unconstitutional a state law restricting gender-affirming care for minors and adults.

  • July 11, 2024

    9th Circ. Signals Dr.'s Vax-Refusal Case Deserves New Chance

    Ninth Circuit judges signaled Thursday that they were likely to revive a doctor's case claiming he was wrongfully fired from his Washington State University residency for refusing to get a COVID-19 vaccination, with two judges questioning if the school went far enough to accommodate his religious beliefs.

  • July 11, 2024

    NFL Arbitration Clause Is Still No Good, Flores Tells 2nd Circ.

    Former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores implored the Second Circuit to keep his racial discrimination suit against the NFL out of arbitration Thursday, telling the court that the closed-door process is "highly oppressive" and tramples over federal law.

  • July 11, 2024

    NLRB Defends Its Home Depot 'BLM' Decision At 8th Circ.

    The National Labor Relations Board on Thursday urged the Eighth Circuit to affirm a ruling that Home Depot illegally pushed out a worker who refused to remove the letters "BLM" from their apron, saying federal labor law protected the worker's protest because it echoed other discrimination complaints.

  • July 11, 2024

    Hospital Urges 4th Circ. To Back Win In Worker's Vax Bias Suit

    A Virginia health system told the Fourth Circuit to let its win stand in a former nurse's lawsuit claiming she was unlawfully fired for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine because of her Christian beliefs, saying the nurse raised only her personal misgivings, not religion, in her exemption request. 

  • July 11, 2024

    Navy Can't Get Out Of Ex-Marine's PTSD Discrimination Suit

    A Washington federal judge won't let the U.S. Navy out of a suit from a former Marine alleging that he was discriminated against and terminated over his post-traumatic stress disorder, saying there is enough evidence that a fact-finder could determine his boss retaliated against him.

  • July 11, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Abbott's Trial Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit refused to upend a jury verdict in favor of Abbott Laboratories and a manager in a Black former financial analyst's lawsuit, saying he failed to show that discrimination was afoot when he was stripped of several job duties and fired while out on leave.

  • July 11, 2024

    Regeneron Accused Of Firing Director Over Leave Requests

    Regeneron Pharmaceuticals fired a director four days after she requested a flexible work schedule to care for her disabled daughter and following her complaints that her boss verbally abused her for taking protected leave, according to a suit filed Thursday in New York federal court. 

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty Fined For Missing 'Every Deadline' Since Feb. In Bias Suit

    A Philadelphia-based attorney has missed so many deadlines in a federal race bias lawsuit against a Penn State University branch campus that the senior circuit judge assigned to his case issued sanctions and a stern warning that a large caseload is no excuse on Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty's Trial Antics Don't Doom $3.4M Bias Verdict, Judge Says

    A trucking company won't get a chance to retry a race discrimination lawsuit that ended in a $3.4 million verdict against it last year after a Georgia federal judge found Wednesday that the plaintiff's counsel's improper conduct at trial didn't prejudice the jury.

  • July 10, 2024

    ​GOP Bombards Agencies With Demands After Chevron's End

    Republican leaders of major congressional committees Wednesday demanded details from dozens of agencies on policies suddenly shrouded in uncertainty after U.S. Supreme Court conservatives overturned the so-called Chevron doctrine, which for 40 years gave regulators flexibility in rulemaking and advantages in related litigation.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atty Says Alaska Judge Reprimand Bolsters 4th Circ. Bias Suit

    A former public defender awaiting a bench ruling on her sexual harassment claims against the federal judiciary said Wednesday that the judge deciding her case should note a recent ruling reprimanding an Alaska federal judge for his "sexualized relationship" with a clerk in which the Ninth Circuit Judicial Council determined that intent was irrelevant.

  • July 10, 2024

    UMB Fired VP After Denying Further Cancer Leave, Suit Says

    UMB Financial Corp. fired an executive for requesting more time to recover from chemotherapy treatments, according to a suit filed in Colorado federal court, after she was made to work 12-hour days in preparation for her leave to complete the work she would miss while she was out.

  • July 10, 2024

    4 State AI Bills To Watch In 2nd Half Of 2024

    After Colorado recently moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence in the workplace, numerous other states across the ideological spectrum — including conservative bastions like Oklahoma — are considering legislation of their own. Here, Law360 looks at four bills to regulate the use of AI in the workplace that bear watching in the second half of 2024. 

  • July 10, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Renew Honeywell DEI Video White Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit refused Wednesday to revive a former Honeywell engineer's claims he was unlawfully fired after he declined to watch a diversity, equity and inclusion training film that he claimed vilified white people, ruling he was only making assumptions since he never watched the video.

  • July 10, 2024

    Salt Co. CEO, Worker Settle Suit Over Spurned Affair

    A Seattle-area gourmet sea salt company has settled a discrimination suit by an employee who says she was demoted and ostracized when she rejected sexual advances from its founder and CEO, who allegedly tried to win her over by paying for a new car, a new apartment and her student loans.

  • July 10, 2024

    X Corp., Musk Dodge $500M Severance Suit

    X Corp. and Elon Musk can escape claims they owe former employees $500 million in severance following the business mogul's purchase of the social platform formerly known as Twitter, a California federal judge ruled, saying the facts don't show that federal benefits law governed the payments workers received.

  • July 10, 2024

    Former Conn. Top Public Defender Claims Bias Led To Ouster

    The former chief public defender in Connecticut has filed a second action challenging her June 4 ouster for misconduct, lodging an administrative appeal in state court that claims racial bias.

  • July 10, 2024

    House Panel Votes To Nix Biden's Retirement Advice Rule

    A Republican-controlled panel of U.S. House lawmakers advanced legislation Wednesday to block recently finalized regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor that expand the definition of a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, after a brief debate on retirement policy that clearly split along party lines.

  • July 10, 2024

    Bankruptcy Filing Halts Dueling Unions' Defamation Dispute

    One of two security and law enforcement unions embroiled in defamation suits in Michigan federal court has informed the court that it has filed for bankruptcy in Pennsylvania, pausing the claims against it a week before trial.

  • July 10, 2024

    Worker Says Law Firm Fired Her For Flagging Harassment

    A law firm brushed off a former accounts payable specialist's complaints that a male contractor was harassing her, telling her his actions were "laughable," and then fired her after she continued to bring up his conduct, she told a Virginia federal court.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atlanta, Ex-Worker Want Trial Rescheduled In Retaliation Case

    The city of Atlanta and a former city department head who says she was fired after blowing the whistle on failures in its immigrant outreach services asked a Georgia federal judge on Tuesday to reschedule a jury trial set to start in August to allow time for private mediation.

  • July 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Partly Revives Jailer's Disability Suit Over Chemicals

    The Sixth Circuit partially revived a deputy jailer's disability bias suit against a Tennessee county, tossing a district court's ruling that she failed to support discrimination claims over her termination and the county's alleged failure to accommodate her allergy to cleaning chemicals.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ohio Hospital Beats Fired Worker's COVID Testing Bias Suit

    An Ohio federal judge tossed a pharmacist's suit claiming a children's hospital flouted her beliefs by firing her after she refused the COVID-19 vaccine and weekly testing on religious grounds, ruling that she wasn't owed an accommodation that could have hurt hospital business.

Expert Analysis

  • Colo. Ruling Adopts 'Actual Discharge' Test For The First Time

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    After a Colorado court’s recent decision in Potts v. Gaia Children, adopting for the first time a test for evaluating an actual discharge claim, employers must diligently document the circumstances surrounding termination of employment, and exercise particular caution when texting employees, says Michael Laszlo at Clark Hill.

  • It's Time For Nationwide Race-Based Hair Protections

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    While 24 states have passed laws that prohibit race-based hair discrimination, this type of bias persists in workplaces and schools, so a robust federal law is necessary to ensure widespread protection, says Samone Ijoma and Erica Roberts at Sanford Heisler.

  • After Chevron: EEOC Status Quo Will Likely Continue

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    As the legal landscape adjusts to the end of Chevron deference, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s rulemaking authority isn’t likely to shift as much as some other employment-related agencies, says Paige Lyle at FordHarrison.

  • After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • FIFA Maternity Policy Shows Need For Federal Paid Leave

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    While FIFA and other employers taking steps to provide paid parental leave should be applauded, the U.S. deserves a red card for being the only rich nation in the world that offers no such leave, says Dacey Romberg at Sanford Heisler.

  • What 2 Rulings On Standing Mean For DEI Litigation

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    Recent federal court decisions in the Fearless Fund and Hello Alice cases shed new light on the ongoing wave of challenges to diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives, with opposite conclusions on whether the plaintiffs had standing to sue, say attorneys at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Brief History Of Joint Employer Rules

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    It's important to examine the journey of the joint employer rule, because if the National Labor Relations Board's Fifth Circuit appeal is successful and the 2023 version is made law, virtually every employer who contracts for labor likely could be deemed a joint employer, say Bruno Katz and Robert Curtis at Wilson Elser.

  • Top 5 Issues For Employers To Audit Midyear

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    Six months into 2024, developments from federal courts and regulatory agencies should prompt employers to reflect on their progress regarding artificial intelligence, noncompetes, diversity initiatives, religious accommodation and more, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Tailoring Compliance Before AI Walks The Runway

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    Fashion industry players that adopt artificial intelligence to propel their businesses forward should consider ways to minimize its perceived downsides, including potential job displacements and algorithmic biases that may harm diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, say Jeffrey Greene and Ivory Djahouri at Foley & Lardner.

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • What High Court Ruling Means For Sexual Harassment Claims

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    In its recent Smith v. Spizzirri decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a district court compelling a case to arbitration is obligated to stay the case rather than dismissing it, but this requirement may result in sexual harassment cases not being heard by appellate courts, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • 5 Steps For Gov't Contractor Affirmative Action Verification

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    As the federal contractor affirmative action program certification deadline approaches, government contractors and subcontractors should take steps to determine their program obligations, and ensure any required plans are properly implemented and timely registered, say Christopher Wilkinson at Perkins Coie and Joanna Colosimo at DCI Consulting.